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Помогите перевести,чтоб был складный текст.Не переводчик!Спасибо

The Miranda Warning.
«You have the right to remain silent, anything you say can be used against you…», these are the words of the Miranda warning which was created as a result of 1966 United States Supreme Court case, Miranda v.Arizona. It began when Ernesto Miranda was arrested at his home and taken into custody to the police station, where he was identified by a witness as the man who had kidnapped and raped a woman. Police officers took Mr. Miranda into an interrogation room and two hours later emerged with a written confession signed by Mr. Miranda that also stated that the confession was made voluntarily and with full knowledge of his legal rights. The officers, however, failed to advise Mr. Miranda that he had a right to have an attorney present.
The United State Supreme Court ruled that the confession could not be used as evidence of Mr. Miranda guilt because he was not fully advised on his legal rights, which included the right to have his attorney present. The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution states that no person can be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law. To ensure that other accused criminals are made aware of their constitutional rights, The Supreme Court ruled that a suspect who is taken into custody and interrogated must receive a warning of the following rights: the rights to remain silent, that anything he says can be used against him in a court of law, that he has a right of the presence of an attorney, and that if he can not afford an attorney, one will be appointed for him prior to any questioning if he so desires. The Miranda warning is now applied by law officers throughout the United States as a result of this ruling

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